In 1953 the Army build 4 Anti-Aircraft-Artillery (AAA) sites, which were equipped with long range 90mm AAA and 70mm radar guided "Sky sweeper" guns as defense of the base.

900 soldiers manned these sites.

For airspace monitoring they build "Aircraft Control and Monitoring" site on base, it was later moved via North Mountain to P-Mountain.

P-Mountain was with its location 766 meters above sea level ideal for spotting incoming planes from the South.

Incoming planes from North and East were detected by N-33 (Site 1), located 169 miles north of the base and N-34 (Site 2) located on the icecap 2000 meters above sea level, 257 miles East north east of the base

Both sites were connected to P-Mountain and were busy right away.

During the first three weeks of March 1954, 286 objects were detected, of which 12 were unidentified.

Of those 12, 8 were identified before crossing the safety zone of 50 miles around base.

The last 4 were identified by F-94 scrambled from the base before the AAA could reach them.

The price tag on Site 2 was $3 Mio. and it was build of huge aluminum tubes that had been dug 38 feet down into the ice.

These tubes contained dormitories and lab space for glacial studies

The site had accommodation for 25 people and were equipped with four 50kw generators.

Under normal circumstances there were manned by 19 men on a three month tour.

In 1956 the site was closed due to severe structural damage on the tubes, which made it dangerous to live there.

Later on, other camps were build, based on the experience gathered on site 2

In 1958 4 missile launch sites (A, B, C and D-Launch) upgraded the defense of Thule Air Base. They were placed in each corner of the main base and each was equipped with 6 launch ramps for Nike-Hercules missiles.

During the years 1959 to 1965 several warheads for these missiles were stored at Thule, and 48 of those were nuclear.

Greenland icecap is in constant motion and would destroy all tunnels within a couple of years, based on that fact all planes for Operation Iceworm were cancelled.

Based on this information, it is natural to consider Site 2 and the later camps (TUTO and Century) to be some sort of preliminary study for Operation Iceworm.

Operation Iceworm.

In 1997 it was revealed (in a rapport from DUPI, Dansk Udenrigspolitisk Institut) that the United States, during the cold war in 1950-60's had top secret plans of using the icecap to cover a huge maze of connected launch sites for 600 medium range missiles, equipped with Nuclear warheads. (Operation Iceworm)

The maze of tunnels should stretch out from Narsarsuaq in south Greenland to camp TUTO in the north, a distance of more than 2950 miles/4000 km.

During 1958, the U.S. conducted a survey on selected spots at Narsarsuaq, Ivigtut, Kvane fjord, Frederikshåb and the base at Sønder Strømfjord (Sondy). In order to find the best spot for an access road to the icecap.

This survey pointed on Narsarsuaq to be the best bed, here it was possible to build a 48 miles/ 65 km road from the airport to the ice.

The price tag would be $20 Mio.

That road was never build.

The Greenland icecap is in constant motion and would destroy all tunnels within a couple of years, based on that fact all planes for Operation Iceworm were cancelled.

Based on this information, it is natural to consider Site 2 and the later camps (TUTO and Century) to be some sort of preliminary study for Operation Iceworm.